Clarification of the assignment, occasion and context

  • What’s the occasion, what’s the theme?
  • Who is the target group, who should be addressed? (For whom – primary and secondary clients/listeners)
  • What is to be achieved with the presentation? Goals/purposes of the lecture/talk (Why?)
  • Duration, time, location, number of participants
  • What are the needs and interests of the participants / the customer in the way (form and sequence) of the event (lecture, discussion, moderation, slides, etc.)?
  • What content does the customer want to know, from what does he have a direct benefit?
  • Handout?
  • What do you know about the circle of participants?
  • Decision maker
  • Know-how and preliminary information of the audience is there any experience with the circle? (experienced yourself or colleagues), special wishes or problems what attitude is there to the topic of presentation?
  • Preparation time for the topic – time budget and remuneration

Preparation

  • Gather information
    • What information do I need?
    • Which ones can I already use?
    • Support with research (delegation possible?)
    • Condensation and selection of the topic
  • Preparation of information
    • Receiver- and goal-oriented
    • Simple and short sentences
    • Limitation to the essentials
    • Visualization of difficult facts
    • Clear and comprehensible message
    • Recognizable “red” thread
    • Good summary at the end

Planning the structure of the speech/presentation

  • To achieve the purposes: How should the speech/presentation be structured – structure?
  • Which contents would have to be visualized and how?
  • Dramaturgy and red thread Getting Started – How to Attract Attention?
  • Final / Final set – What do I want to achieve?
  • What is to be transported? Conclusion?
  • Invitation
  • Create keyword list

Tips:

  • Is the information relevant to the listener?
  • Do they offer him any added value/benefit?
  • The information as such is irrelevant, important is what it means to the viewer personally.
  • The “digestibility” of the content – small steps, section by section and summary
  • Visualization: approx. 75% of the information is recorded through the eyes.
  • Address “heart and brain” in parallel
  • Use names of listeners
  • Pictorial language
  • Using examples from the audience’s field of experience

Structure and structure of presentations

  • welcoming address
    • First silence (four to five deep breaths)
    • Greeting (Only those who feel welcomed feel addressed.) introductory remarks
  • Opening/entry
    • Attract attention, Hanger, Anecdote,
  • Quote subject
    • “Headline” of the presentation
  • Inauguration
    • Explain the goal or purpose of the presentation (“mutual expectation management”)
    • Short personal introduction if necessary
    • Short description of the current situation, so that the listeners get an equal starting point
    • Background, demarcation, prehistory
  • Clarify orientation/procedure
    • Table of contents
    • Specification of duration
    • Clarification on how to deal with questions during the presentation
  • (Main) presentation part
    • Structure, structure target group oriented (“breadth vs. depth”), simple, understandable, …
    • Point by point
    • Allow questions ending
  • Summary of facts/arguments
    • Solution proposal
    • Next steps/outlook/request for action, decisions, appeal etc.
    • Possible explanation of the handouts
    • End (e.g. with a quotation)

Tips:

  • Orientation aid through keywords or a set of slides for each presentation and one with notes
  • Structure and language should be
    • Simplicity,
    • clear structure and order,
    • brevity and conciseness,
    • additional stimulant.

Design of presentations

  • Format (general)
    • Observe CD regulations
    • Logo
    • Font sizes
    • Colors
    • Slide headings
    • Appropriate page layout
    • Do not overstrain graphics
    • Less is better than more.
    • Economical with animation effects
  • Representation (slides)
    • Landscape
    • Foils built on top of each other
    • For your own orientation, number the slides at the bottom right.
    • Set the title bar centered or left justified, at least 26 pt.
    • No justification for texts
    • Size of text lines between 16 and 24 pt
    • Only one graphic element per foil
    • Display numbers as graphically as possible
    • Use of structural images/graphics for processes, systems, etc. instead of words
  • Avoid it:
    • Too much information on one slide – Writing or printing errors
    • Numbers without graphic support – Uneven overall picture
    • Font too small for title and text page – background with distracting patterns and colors
    • Vertical or diagonal texts – too many slides with too complex contents in too short distances
    • Crazy sound effects – leave slides lying around even after editing
    • Bad foil transitions
    • Use transparencies as magnification media for text pages
    • “Flying Text”
    • Strange animations
    • Bad clip arts
  • Principles:
    • legibility
    • clearness
    • attractiveness

Preparation of presentations

  • Interruptions
    • Do not ring the phones
    • Prevent third parties from entering the site
    • Block times, especially if the room is used by other people otherwise (also applies to cleaning personnel, kitchen, etc.).
    • Schedule fixed break times for telephone calls and miscellaneous
  • Furnishing of the rooms
    • Provide sufficient chairs, possibly one to two more than planned
    • Seating arrangement (depending on the number of listeners, room size, presentation content and presentation media)
    • Provide a table for yourself (for notes, slides, handouts …)
    • Planning darkening possibilities
    • Ensure adequate room temperature and ventilation, air conditioning if necessary
  • Appliances
    • Try first
    • Make sure they can be operated
    • Replacement material (batteries, light bulbs, back-ups …)
  • Personal
    • Time of presentation
    • Pay attention to attention level
    • Test run alone (e.g. in front of the mirror) or in the presence of colleagues, friends, etc.
    • Hand notes (use flashcards if you are nervous)
    • Be prepared for possible questions (possibly asking colleagues what questions might come),
    • At the same time be self-confident enough not to have an answer to certain questions and refer to appropriate experts
    • Arrive in time before (buffer time or time to orient yourself personally)

Tips

  • Practice, trial run (alone, friends, operation, etc.)
  • Allow time for preparation (manuscript, key points, etc.)
  • Immediately before the lecture: autosuggestively calm down, consciously relax

Self-management during the presentation

  • Trust in your preparation!
  • Believe in your abilities!
  • The audience is coming to hear from you.
  • Eye contact to a “sympathetic” listener
  • Treat trifles such as slip of the tongue or water glass topple over as trifles.
  • First break with four to five deep breath trains
  • Maintain your concept
  • If listeners are restless, seem disinterested or leave the room, this does not necessarily have anything to do with you (toilet, next appointment, hunger, mobile phone, etc.).
  • Check the time, stick to the concept, if necessary increase the speed a little, only introduce the essentials – stay calm and friendly.